Six Nations for MND

Charity Campaign

During the 2024 Six Nations rugby tournament we're supporting My Name'5 Doddie foundation with £1 from every bottle you purchase in this category.
Between 1st February and 16th March 2024.

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About our Campaign

We’re partnering with Work for Good to donate £1 from each sale of the bottles above to My Name’5 Doddie – a charity founded by the late Doddie Weir OBE to tackle Motor Neuron Disease.

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Founded by Doddie Weir OBE, one of rugby's most recognisable personalities, My Name'5 Doddie was set up in 2017 to tackle Motor Neuron Disease.
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As an international rugby player, Doddie earned 61 caps for Scotland and became a fan favourite among the Murrayfield faithful.
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Doddie battled Motor Neuron Disease from 2016 to his passing in 2022, striving to help other sufferers of this, as yet, incurable disease.

Interview with Doddie Weir OBE

In 2020, we spoke to Doddie Weir OBE for Whiskeria magazine.

Congratulations on all the incredible work you and the team are doing through the My Name’5 Doddie foundation! For those who may not know, can you explain what Motor Neuron Disease is, and how it is affecting you?

It’s a muscle-wasting disease caused by a chemical imbalance from your brain to your muscles. Your leg muscles disappear so you can’t walk, your arm muscles disappear so you can’t hold things, brush your teeth, put your clothes on, shower, shave – it makes life quite tricky! It goes on to affect your speech, your swallowing and your diaphragm, so eventually you can’t breathe by yourself. It’s quite a horrific thing to happen to you.

From my rugby days, I’ve always understood that teamwork brings about the best results, and the more we have on the team, the better the position we’ll be in to conquer MND.

Soon after your diagnosis, you launched your foundation My Name’5 Doddie. Why did you decide to set it up?

In life, I’ve always thought, when you’ve got a problem, what do you do? You try and fix it.

The problem with MND is that there’s no cure, nothing for patients to get involved in and no positive space for them. When a patient gets diagnosed with MND they need to self-cure. By that, I mean they need to go home, go on their computer and search on Google for cures and remedies. Patients need to decide for themselves what’s good and what’s bad, and I don’t think that should be the way it’s done. So that’s what we’re changing with the foundation.

It’s no secret that you’re a fan of a dram! Can you remember your first taste of whisky?

Well, whisky’s been a major part of my life for many years, and still is. My whisky journey really kicked off during my rugby days. I remember being at the Old Course Hotel in St. Andrews with a few of the rugby boys when Duncy Paterson, our manager at the time, bought us a round of Glen Grant 1936. £131 a dram! And this was in 1990. That was probably my first introduction to whisky. And not a bad one at that.

There’s been a lot of good drams taken over the years. I’m sure when I got my first cap, I had a lot of whisky that night. I can’t really remember it, but we’ll say it was nice!